52 Books in 52 Weeks

Like most university students, there was a great disparity between the academic reading list I was set and the list of books I actually managed to read. Ashamed as I am to admit it, there were days when catching up with Orange is the New Black took priority over devouring William Faulkner’s Light In August. But worry not, I am seeking to rectify this literary laziness.

I am constantly acquiring new additions to my ‘to-read list’ and pick up perused paperbacks in charity shops like the Kindle has issued an exile order of its print foes. And yet very rarely do I sit down and make time for reading. By the time I roll in to bed I can barely keep my eyes open and the only time I read consistently is when I’ve had the fortune of discovering a real page-turner. Or when the Wi-Fi is down.

So I’ve set myself a challenge. I’m never going to run the London Marathon, so this is my literary equivalent. Something that feels momentous and worthy, and won’t damage but knees, but nevertheless looks nigh on impossible. The risk of failing runs high, and no doubt there will be weekends when curling up with a box-set, or remembering what it feels like to have sun on my skin and frolic in the grass will usurp the quest to quench 52 pieces of literature.

But I’m setting myself the task nevertheless (to be honest I’ve never done much frolicking anyway). I may encounter perilous paper-cuts, magical-realist induced migraines and waves of self-doubt, yet power through I shall.

I’ve compiled the list below and will strike-through the ones I manage to complete. This is made up of the astonishing number of novels, memoirs and non-fiction fancies that I already own, but have stockpiled to be enjoyed at a later date. Some are titles I have claimed to have already read (three of which I already have, but would like to revisit), a couple are ones I’ve started but failed to finish and the rest are journeys I have yet to begin with charaters I have yet to encounter. I also own War and Peace, but that’s going to remain on the shelf in a decorative capacity only.

I’m aiming to jot a few thoughts down on each entry. The game-plan is to start a book each Monday and by Sunday be able to give a snippet review. This post is a bit belated as I’ve read the first five, but I wanted some assurance this was a project worth investing in/blogging about, before diving straight in, realising it was all too overwhelming (like this year’s journal-keeping aspiration – last entry dated January 24th) and retreating back to Netflix with my high-minded tail between my legs. That being said, I’m already lagging behind, as I finished no.5 on Tuesday and only picked up no.6 on Thursday, but hey, everyone loves an underdog. Here goes nothing…

  1. How To Be Alone – Jonathan Franzen
  2. The Goldfinch – Donna Tartt
  3. Wild – Cheryl Strayed
  4. How Should A Person Be? – Sheila Heti
  5. The Colossus of New York – Colson Whitehead
  6. The Light Between Oceans – M.L. Steadman
  7. Pure – Andrew Miller
  8. This Changes Everything – Naomi Klein
  9. The Godfather – Mario Puzo
  10. One Hundred Years Of Solitude – Gabriel Garcia Marquez
  11. In The Lake In The Woods – Tim O’Brien
  12. Into The Wild – Jon Krakauer
  13. How The French Invented Love – Marilyn Yalom
  14. The Hundred-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared – Jonas Jonasson
  15. I Am Malala – Malala Yousafzai
  16. Of Mice And Men – John Steinbeck
  17. The Engagements – J Courtney Sullivan
  18. American Tabloid – James Ellroy
  19. L.A. Confidential – James Ellroy
  20. Jazz – Toni Morrison
  21. Beloved – Toni Morrison
  22. American Rust – Phillip Meyer
  23. Americana – Don DeLillo
  24. Half of a Yellow Sun – Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
  25. Americanah – Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
  26. The Wolf of Wall Street – Jordan Belfort
  27. Slaughterhouse Five – Kurt Vonnegut
  28. The Finkler Question – Howard Jacobson
  29. Gone Girl – Gillian Flynn
  30. Restless – William Boyd
  31. Not That Kind Of Girl – Lena Dunham
  32. Wild Swans – Jung Chang
  33. Far From The Madding Crowd – Thomas Hardy
  34. Jude The Obscure – Thomas Hardy
  35. Wikileaks and The Age of Transparency – Micah L. Sifry
  36. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn – Mark Twain
  37. The Crossing – Cormac McCarthy
  38. Memoirs of a Geisha – Arthur Golden
  39. All The King’s Men – Robert Penn Warren
  40. The Good German – Joseph Kanon
  41. The Last Tycoon – F. Scott Fitzgerald
  42. Why Nations Fail -Daron Acemoğlu and James A. Robinson
  43. Brideshead Revisited – Evelyn Waugh
  44. The White Tiger – Aravind Adiga
  45. Runaway Jury – John Grisham
  46. 1984 – George Orwell
  47. The Portrait of a Lady – Henry James
  48. Life of Pi – Yann Martel
  49. The Colour Purple – Alice Walker
  50. The Unbearable Lightness of Being – Milan Kundera
  51. Mrs Dalloway – Virgina Woolf
  52. Yes Please – Amy Poehler
Advertisements

One thought on “52 Books in 52 Weeks

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s